Summer series – XXth century architecture in Berlin

vitre, immeuble Oskar Niemeyer, photo Catherine Gras

Six months of writing on many topics, including Berlin. I’d like this week to take a look back at some of the posts that show the architectural modernity in Berlin. A subjective choice of course.

I propose you a post every 15 days with different themes to adapt to the rhythm of the summer .

We start with some examples of architecture under the Weimar Republic, the 1920s. It looks like the Bauhaus? Yes, but these movements developed in parallel, reflecting the spirit of their time: to make equipped, modern, bright housing available to the greatest number.

The white town – Weisse Stadt :

https://wherever-it-is.com/2021/04/16/the-white-city-of-berlin/

façade immeuble, photo Catherine Gras

The Siemens factory buildings and the surrounding housing:

https://wherever-it-is.com/2021/07/02/siemensstadt-industrial-culture-and-utopia/

photo Catherine Gras

Then came the 1950s with the need to rebuild a destroyed Berlin. First East Berlin with its imposing buildings around Stalinallee, now Karl Marx Allee:

https://wherever-it-is.com/2021/03/26/east-berlin-in-the-50s-karl-marx-allee/

Kino International, photo Catherine Gras

And then in the West, Hansaviertel:

https://wherever-it-is.com/2021/03/28/west-berlin-ouest-in-the-50s-hansaviertel/

cage d'escalier transparence et porte jauneSchwedenhaus, photo Catherine Gras

With the political split of the city, followed by the construction of the Wall, it became necessary to duplicate some places, notably cultral centers. In the West, the Kulturforum and the Philharmonie were buit to become the new cultural center of the city, I have devoted two posts to them, I propose one here.

https://wherever-it-is.com/2021/04/30/berlin-philharmonie-hans-sharoun/

entrée, photo Catherine Gras

I stop in the 50s and 60s for this architectural stroll. See you in 15 days for the next post, on a completely different subject.

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